Our stories for our future

We all deserve an education that imparts honesty about who we are, integrity in how we treat others, and courage to do what’s right.  For too long, too many of us have been given little to no knowledge of Native history—or have been taught inaccurate information. When we’re not taught the full truth, we make room for bias, discrimination, and injustice. But when we teach honestly about our history, we realize our shared connections and make progress towards justice possible. On October 11, Indigenous Peoples’ Day—and all year long—learn more deeply about Native peoples whose land we occupy.

  • Indigenous Peoples Day
    Illuminatives.org
    Learn how to advocate for the celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day during the time of Covid-19 with an Indigenous Peoples’ Day Toolkit.

 

  • National Museum of the American Indian
    Smithsonian
    Use these resources to bring new ways of thinking about Native Americans to multiple disciplines, including science, English language arts, and social studies.
  • Indigenous People’s Day Teach-In
    Tuesday, October 15
    NEA, Rumble, TeachRock
    Join with K-12 teachers nationwide to honor indigenous history and presence through the TeachRock Rumble curriculum.
  • National Indian Education Association
    NIEA
    The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed by Native educators in 1969 to encourage a national discourse on Native education.
  • NCAI Vaccination Toolkit
    National Congress of American Indians
    This toolkit, developed by NCAI and NEA, is intended to provide American Indian and Alaska Natives access to factual information about COVID-19 vaccines and to provide additional resources.
  • Native Vote
    NativeVote.org
    Native Vote focuses on voter registration and get‐out‐the‐Native‐vote (GOTNV), election protection, education and data collect to measure the impact of the Native vote.
  • All My Relations Podcast
    AllMyRelationsPodcast.com
    All My Relations is a podcast hosted by Matika Wilbur (Swinomish and Tulalip) and Adrienne Keen (Cherokee Nation) to explore our relationships – relationships to land, to our creatural relatives and to one another.
  • Correct(ed) Series
    NEA EdJustice
    This series tackles problems in history that we often teach wrong.